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CLEP

College-Level Examination Program

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is a series of examinations in 33 introductory college subjects that allow individuals to earn college credit for what they already know regardless of how that knowledge was acquired.

DSST® Program

The DSST® Program is a nationally recognized testing program that gives you the opportunity to receive college credit for learning acquired outside the traditional college classroom.

Residual ACT

The Residual ACT at OKWU is used to help determine eligibility for undergraduate admission.

CLEP

About

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is a series of examinations in 33 introductory college subjects that allow individuals to earn college credit for what they already know regardless of how that knowledge was acquired: through advanced course work, independent study, work experience, professional development, or extracurricular activities. OKWU awards credit for successful scores on several CLEP exams. Click Here to see a list of CLEP exams offered for OKWU credit, the credit-granting score, and the equivalent courses.

Most CLEP exams are 90 minutes long unless an essay portion is required, primarily multiple-choice (although some exams have fill-in-the-blank questions), and are administered on a computer. The examinee will receive an instant unofficial score report following completion of the exam.

For descriptions of individual CLEP exams, visit the CLEP website.

Fee

Each CLEP exam costs $89, payable to CLEP. In addition, for non-OKWU students, there is a $50 proctor fee payable by check or exact cash. Examinees must pay the CLEP exam fee online at the CLEP website by credit card. CLEP does not accept cash.

Registration

Examinees may register for the exam when they arrive at the testing center. We ask that examinees make an appointment to make sure that a computer is available on the desired date and time. When scheduling an appointment, allow approximately two hours for both registration and the exam itself or four hours for exams with essays. Exams may be scheduled Monday through Friday during our hours of operation. No CLEP exams will be administered during finals week.

 

Procedure
  1. Students must fill out a Credit by Examination Application Form and get it signed by all the appropriate offices.
  2. Once formed is filled out bring the form to the Student Success Center office to schedule a testing date and time.
  3. On your test date, make sure you bring appropriate forms of ID and the registration ticket.
  4. Your application form will be kept in the SCC until the test scores are received, and scores will be reported to the Registrars office.
  5. Once we receive the official score report, there will be an additional $75 fee ($25 per credit hour) to report your passing score on your OKWU transcript.

For further questions regarding the CLEP testing procedure, visit our office, or email us at sshattingh@okwu.edu.

DSST® Program

About

The DSST® Program is a nationally recognized testing program that gives you the opportunity to receive college credit for learning acquired outside the traditional college classroom.

DSST offers exams in 38 introductory college subjects that allow individuals to earn college credit for what they already know regardless of how that knowledge was acquired: through advanced course work, independent study, work experience, professional development, or extracurricular activities. OKWU awards credit for successful scores on several DSST exams. Click Here to see a list of DSST exams offered for OKWU credit, the credit-granting score, and the equivalent courses.

DSST exams are 120 minutes long, primarily multiple-choice (although some exams have fill-in-the-blank questions), and are administered on a computer. The examinee will receive an instant unofficial score following completion of the exam.

For descriptions of individual CLEP exams, visit the DSST website.

Fee

Each DSST exam costs $85, payable to DSST. In addition, for non-OKWU students, there is a $50 proctor fee payable by check or exact cash. Examinees must pay the DSST exam fee by credit card only.

Registration

Examinees may register for the exam when they arrive at the testing center. We ask that examinees make an appointment to make sure that a computer is available on the desired date and time. When scheduling an appointment, allow approximately two hours for both registration and the exam itself. Exams may be scheduled Monday through Friday during our hours of operation. No DSST exams will be administered during finals week.

 

Procedure
  1. Students must fill out a Credit by Examination Application Form and get it signed by all the appropriate offices.
  2. Once formed is filled out bring the form to the Student Success Center office to schedule a testing date and time.
  3. On your test date, make sure you bring appropriate forms of I.D. and payment.
  4. Your application form will be kept in the SCC until the test scores are received, and scores will be reported to the Registrars office
  5. Once we receive the official score report, there will be an additional $75 fee ($25 per credit hour) to report your passing score on your OKWU transcript.

Residual ACT

About

The Residual ACT at OKWU is used to help determine eligibility for undergraduate admission. The Residual ACT given at OKWU can only be used for OKWU purposes. These scores cannot be transferred to another college or university, and there are no additional score reports available.

The exam consists of four multiple-choice sections: English (45 minutes), Math (60 minutes), Reading (35 minutes), and Science Reasoning (35 minutes).

Fee

The Residual ACT fee is $45 and is payable to OKWU. This fee may be paid by cash, check, or money order on the day of testing.

Registration

Registration – Contact our office to inquire about testing dates for each semester.

Required Identification – Examinees must present a photo I.D. to be admitted to the test when they arrive at the testing center. Acceptable forms of identification include a driver’s license, school I.D., military I.D., or current passport.

 

Procedure

Scoring Information

The tests will be scored immediately following the completion of the exam, and scores will be reported to the Office of Admissions.

Policies and Procedures

  • Examinees must have applied for admission or be an enrolled student at OKWU before taking the Residual ACT test.
  • No examinee will be admitted to the testing area after exam administration has begun.
  • Examinees must present acceptable identification to be admitted to the testing area.
  • Examinees should bring a permitted calculator. We will not loan calculators or provide batteries, and examinees are not allowed to share calculators.
  • The following items are not permitted in the testing room: books, dictionaries, notes, scratch paper (other than scratch paper provided by the testing center), highlighters, colored pens or pencils, correction fluid, electronic devices (other than a permitted calculator), reading material, food or drink, and tobacco.
  • If an examinee finishes a section early, he/she will not be allowed to work on the next section or go back to a previous section.
  • No talking or communication with other examinees is allowed.
  • Examinees are not permitted to access electronic devices (including cell phones) at any time during the test or during the break.

Retest Policy

Examinees must wait 60 days before retaking the Residual ACT. If an examinee retakes the Residual ACT before the 60-day time limit, the retest will be canceled, and no refund will be made.

Disability Services

Step 1: Gather Documentation

  1. Application for Disability Accomodations
  2. Release of Information Request
  3. Informed Consent

Step 2: Meet with the Disabilities Coordinator
Sunshine Hattingh
sshattingh@okwu.edu
918-397-4351

Step 3: Communicate with Professors

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Secondary Verses Post-Secondary

High School

Laws: Services provided under IDEA or Section 504.

Responsibility:

  • School district is responsible for identifying, evaluating, and planning educational interventions.
  • Involve parents or guardians.
  • Provide non-academic services.
  • Modify educational programs or requirements.
  • Prepare IEPs, 504 plans.
Post-Secondary

Laws: Services provided under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and The Americans with Disabilities Act.

Responsibility: 

  • Students are responsible for self-identification, providing documentation, and obtaining disability services
  • Deal directly with student (18+ years old); protect student’s right to privacy (FERPA)
  • Provide access to any service, program, or activity sponsored by the institution.
  • Provide accommodations in order to meet established standards/requirements.
  • Provide reasonable accommodations based on documentation and student request.

Frequenty Asked questions

How do students access services?

Students with disabilities that wish to access services may initialize their request by contacting the Disabilities Coordinator. Students can expect to meet with the coordinator to discuss their academic needs. During this intake process, students will have an opportunity to identify specific academic accommodations and will be asked to complete a formal request form, a release of information form, and provide current documentation about their disability.

How do students qualify for services?

OKWU is committed to serving all students with disabilities as defined by federal regulations. A qualified person with a disability means: …an individual with a disability who, with or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or practices, the removal of architectural, communication, or transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids and services, meets the essential eligibility requirements for the receipt of services or the participation in programs or activities provided by a public entity.

 The federal definition of a disability includes a person who (1) has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more of such person’s major life activities, (2) has a record of such impairment, or (3) is regarded as having such impairment.

 The student must provide documentation of impairment and the documentation must show that the impairment restricts his or her ability to perform a major life function in comparison to most people. If a person does not have a physical or mental impairment that does not substantially limit a major life activity the person is not entitled to ADA protection.

 The determination of whether an individual has a disability under ADA is not based upon the name or diagnosis of the impairment, but rather upon the impact of that impairment on the life of the individual.

How often must a student request services?

Planned services are provided based upon the requests of the student. Since different classes may require different accommodations it is important to look at a student’s needs on a semester-by-semester basis. Services, therefore, must be requested at least once prior to the beginning of each semester or at the time a need is identified within a semester.

Why is a diagnosis not enough? A friend of mine has the same diagnosis and gets different accommodations.

The use of accommodations in post-secondary institutions is based upon more than just the diagnosis of a disability. It is based upon the severity of impact (functional impact) on a major life activity. This is why documentation for a post-secondary institution has to provide more information than just a diagnosis. It must address the severity of the impact. Another student with the same disability may be impacted differently by his or her disability; therefore, all accommodations are viewed on a case-by-case basis.

My parents have always taken care of my accommodations with the school. Can’t they bring in documentation without me and handle this for me?

No. Students at post-secondary institutions are considered adults. The agreement for services needs to be made with the person requesting the services and not at the request of the third party. The federal laws and FERPA are very clear that institutions are not to communicate, without written permission from the student, to anyone other than the student about that individual’s academic progress and/or disability-related needs.

Are there special classes or programs designed just for students with learning disabilities?

No. The purpose of the accommodations is to provide each student with equal access to the information and course content. Given these accommodations, a student who is otherwise qualified should be able to be successful within the context of a normal classroom setting.

Is there someone who will help me obtain accommodations if I run into problems?

Yes. Speak with Sunshine Hattingh the Disabilities Coordinator — the person with whom you arranged your accommodations. She will assist you in trying to resolve any conflict that may arise.

Why can’t I just do my work at home and come to class when I feel like it?

While in some classes, attendance may not be a critical issue, in many classes it is considered to be a critical component of the curriculum. Examples would be when learning is a hands-on experience, involves group dynamics or interaction, and/or extends beyond just textbook knowledge of a subject. Many times some flexibility in an attendance policy might be negotiated with an instructor, but in some cases that may not be possible.

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